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Can people of color get skin cancer?

Can people of color get skin cancer?

Skin cancer is definitely less common for people of color but sadly when it occurs the prognosis tends to be worse as issues are often detected at a more advanced stage. The Skin Cancer Foundation cites one study which found that the five-year survival rate for people of color was 65%, versus 90% for white people. 

People of color tend to get skin cancer less as they have higher levels of melanin which acts as a natural defensive barrier to UV. However, lower incidence rates result in people of colour being less likely to check their skin for suspicious lesions, wear a high SPF sunscreen or UPF 50+ sun protective sun hats or clothing.

Another challenge is that skin cancers can be harder to detect due to the pigmentation of carcinomas. Also, and for a reason that remains unknown to the experts, skin cancers on people of color are often found on the extremities (feet or hands) which can be difficult to detect. Tragically, Bob Marley died aged 36 due to melanoma from under his toenail.

The important takeaway is that everyone is at risk of sunburn, skin aging and skin cancer irrespective of their skin color.

Dermatologists recommend that people of color self-examine their skin once a month and get a skin check once a year. 

Solbari sun protection offers a range of UPF 50+ sun protective clothing, broad brim sun hats, accessories and SPF 50+ sunscreen.

You can find out more about Solbari's certified UPF50+ sun protective range by clicking the blue links below:
Women UPF50+
Men UPF50+
Sun hats UPF50+
Accessories UPF50+ 

The Solbari Team
This blog is for information purposes only, always consult your medical professional.



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